Review: Shatter Me (Shatter Me #1) by

13455782

Goodreads Summary:

Juliette hasn’t touched anyone in exactly 264 days.

The last time she did, it was an accident, but The Reestablishment locked her up for murder. No one knows why Juliette’s touch is fatal. As long as she doesn’t hurt anyone else, no one really cares. The world is too busy crumbling to pieces to pay attention to a 17-year-old girl. Diseases are destroying the population, food is hard to find, birds don’t fly anymore, and the clouds are the wrong color.

The Reestablishment said their way was the only way to fix things, so they threw Juliette in a cell. Now so many people are dead that the survivors are whispering war – and The Reestablishment has changed its mind. Maybe Juliette is more than a tortured soul stuffed into a poisonous body. Maybe she’s exactly what they need right now.

Juliette has to make a choice: Be a weapon. Or be a warrior.


My Review

Shatter Me has been all over my news feeds for quite some time. I have to admit, I’ve been very conflicted over picking up this book. There are just so many conflicting reviews and feelings on it. And I’m beginning to see why.

Shatter Me focuses on the life of a girl who, for whatever reason, was born with a deadly gift. Everyone she touches for just long enough, dies, and if they let go fast enough, still suffer excruciating pain. She has never known the comfort of touch or the love of another, but has always been regarded as a monster. That is, until she is given a new cellmate at the mental asylum she’s imprisoned in, one who provides a new opportunity she could never dream of.

This book had an interesting concept from the get-go. The setting is dystopian, the girl has an unexplained ability, and of course there’s a romance. All things I love. However, I didn’t necessarily love Shatter Me. I didn’t dislike it either. Mafi’s writing style is unique to say the least. Unfortunately, it’s also a little scattered. One minute, I’m falling in love with her poetic imagery and analogies, and the next, I’m utterly confused and befuddled by how it has a place in the story. She just threw similes and metaphors around willy-nilly, without thought as to how it really fits into the narration. It was just a little too over the top, and didn’t quite work with the content. It also made certain descriptions way too long winded.

Despite the bizarre/sometimes annoying way of writing, I flew through this book. It was fast paced through out, and generally an easy book to get through. The ending events definitely intrigued me enough to continue. Shatter Me also came with plenty of unanswered questions. These characters are most certainly not who they appear to be; and I look forward to discovering the truth.

Buy Shatter Me on Amazon now.

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